Tag: pancreas

Dec

13

Glucagon ~ How Does It Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Glucagon ~ How Does It Raise Your Blood Sugar?As diabetics, glucagon plays a vital role in part of our overall management and as I experienced a couple weeks ago, it can save your life. As a type 1 diabetic, I’m very well versed on how this works (unfortunately), and why it is so important and how it can keep us out of emergent situations or in my case, help you come out of a diabetic seizure.

So for all the newly diagnosed diabetics out there, young and old, what is glucagon? What is it so important that we should have it on us at all time, wherever we go? Lets take a closer look!

 

What Is Glucagon:

Glucagon is a hormone (like insulin) that is naturally made in the pancreas. The pancreas produces this hormone when the body needs to put more sugar (glucose) in the blood to be used for energy. Glucagon raises the blood sugar by sending a signal to the liver and muscles (where your body naturally stores glucose) to release glucose.

The difference between the two, is that insulin lowers your blood glucose (sugar) by helping your body use the glucose in the blood for energy. Glucagon raises your blood glucose (sugar) by causing the liver and muscles to release stored glucose quickly. Though glucagon helps raise the level of glucose in the blood, it is not considered a sugar.

In its simplest form per Lilly, one of the manufactures of glucagon kits:

Glucagon is a medicine that’s different from insulin. It’s used to treat severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Glucagon works by telling your body to release sugar into the bloodstream to bring the blood sugar level back up.

The Role Of Glucagon In The Body:

Glucagon plays an active role in allowing the body to regulate the utilization of glucose and fats.

Glucagon is released in response to low blood glucose levels and to events whereby the body needs additional glucose, such as in response to vigorous exercise.

When glucagon is released it can perform the following tasks:

    • Stimulating the liver to break down glycogen to be released into the blood as glucose
    • Activating gluconeogenesis, the conversion of amino acids into glucose
    • Breaking down stored fat (triglycerides) into fatty acids for use as fuel by cells

Insulin And Glucagon:

Glucagon is usually given by injection beneath the skin, in the muscle, or in the vein. It comes as a powder and liquid that will need to be mixed just before administering the dose. Instructions for mixing and giving the injection are in the package. Glucagon should be administered as soon as possible after discovering that the patient is unconscious from low blood sugar. After the injection, the patient should be turned onto the side to prevent choking if they vomit. Once the injection has been given, contact your doctor. It is very important that all patients have a household member who knows the symptoms of low blood sugar and how to administer glucagon.

If you have low blood sugar often, keep a glucagon kit with you at all times. You should be able to recognize some of the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (i.e., shakiness, dizziness or lightheadedness, sweating, confusion, nervousness or irritability, sudden changes in behavior or mood, headache, numbness or tingling around the mouth, weakness, pale skin, sudden hunger, clumsy or jerky movements). Try to eat or drink a food or beverage with sugar in it, such as hard candy or fruit juice, before it is necessary to administer.

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Jun

23

What Is C-Peptide? How Does It Play A Factor In Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is C-Peptide? How Is It Used To Diagnose DiabetesIts a fantastic question and was a test that was run on me to confirm my type 1 diagnosis. A c-peptide!  What is it?  What is the purpose and why do they use this particular test in order to confirm a type 1 diabetes diagnosis?  Lets take a closer look! 

What Is C-Peptide?

C-peptide, similar to the hormone insulin is produced in the pancreas.  Both are released simultaneously from the pancreas where a compound called pro-insulin is split into two pieces.

As we are aware by now, Insulin is responsible for regulating the body’s glucose levels. Glucose, the body’s main source of energy, is a sugar that comes from foods.  After a meal, our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream to give us the energy we need in order to fuel our bodies. Glucose levels in the blood rise after a meal and trigger the pancreas to make insulin and release it into the blood, and when insulin is released, so is C-peptide.

Although both are released into the blood stream simultaneous, C-peptide has zero effect on our blood sugar levels. That being said, it is extremely useful as its used as a marker of insulin production, since the pancreas typically releases C-peptide and insulin in about equal amounts.

In a nut shell, high C-peptide levels are associated with increased insulin production, while low C-peptide levels indicate decreased insulin production.

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Oct

14

Gestational Diabetes: All You Need To Know To Get You Ready

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know!I fielded a question the other day on my Facebook page regarding the effects gestational diabetes has on the body.  Well, I’ll be honest with you.  Even as a type 1 diabetic, dealing with the daily highs and lows, I wasn’t 100% sure, so lets take a closer look!  

Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that comes on during pregnancy. It affects about 4% of all pregnant women, according to the American Diabetes Association. Gestational diabetes is often diagnosed on screening tests done between weeks 24 and 28 of pregnancy.

While doctors aren’t sure what causes gestational diabetes, it is believed that hormones from the placenta may block the action of insulin in the mother.  This means that the mother needs more insulin and sometimes her pancreas cannot make enough to transport the sugar in the blood into the cells for energy.  The mother’s blood has high levels of glucose, which can cross the placenta, giving the growing baby a high blood sugar level.

Gestational Diabetes & Pregnancy:

Gestational diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone.  It moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy.  During pregnancy, a woman’s cells naturally become slightly more resistant to insulin’s effects.  This change is designed to increase the mother’s blood glucose level to make more nutrients available to the baby. The mother’s body makes more insulin to keep the blood glucose level normal. In a small number of women, even this increase is not enough to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range.  As a result, they develop gestational diabetes.

Signs & Symptoms:

The symptoms of gestational diabetes are not very prominent and are similar to that of pregnancy.  Hence, they are not easily distinguished.  Listed below are few of the symptoms you can experience during pregnancy.

  • Feeling thirsty often
  • Frequent urination
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Bladder infection
  • Vaginal infection
  • Blurred vision
  • Visible loss of weight


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Jan

4

Health Benefits Of Chlorella:

Researching some supplements the other days, I came across a little know powerhouse call chlorella. Chlorella, a blue-green algae, is one of the most nutritionally dense green foods on the planet. While it is debatable, many experts think chlorella offers just about every nutrient required by the human body, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, nucleic acids, chlorophyll and a full spectrum of phytochemicals.

 

Detox And Chlorella:

These days, toxins come at us from every possible angle: food, air, water, beauty products, cleaning supplies and even clothing. It’s important to give the body what it needs to detox from all the harmful substances it encounters each day. Chlorella has an amazing ability to bind with toxins like chemicals and heavy metals, and move them swiftly out of the body. These benefits are powerful and can have a definite positive impact on

Weight Loss Benefits?

Chlorella’s unique properties may also have the ability to lower overall body fat. One 2008 Japanese study showed chlorella can reduce body fat percentages. This may be due to its ability to aid fat metabolism and improve insulin sensitivity. Plus, when we replace nutritionally empty foods with powerful superfoods like chlorella, the body tends to crave less junk food because it feels more nourished.
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