Tag: digestive system

Jan

18

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes, Is There A Connection?

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes, Is There A Connection?So the other day I fielded a question about celiac disease and if there is a direct correlation between having celiac and type 1 diabetes.  A great question as more type 1 diabetics seem to be diagnosed with celiac disease after their type 1 diagnosis.  So what’s the deal with celiac disease?  What is it exactly and what can be done to help alleviate the symptoms?  Lets take a closer look!

 

What Is Celiac Disease:

Celiac disease is a digestive illness that occurs due to the ingestion of gluten. If you have celiac disease, your intestines cannot tolerate the presence of gliadin, which is a component of gluten. Gluten is present in wheat, barley, and rye. When a person with celiac disease eats foods with gluten, such as bread or cereal, their immune system inappropriately reacts to the ingested gluten and causes inflammation and injury to the small intestine. This results in symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, and weight loss, as well as an inability to absorb important food nutrients.

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes:

So what’s the deal when it comes to type 1 diabetes and a celiac disease diagnosis?  While there doesn’t appear to be a direct link between type 2 diabetes and celiac that’s not necessarily the case when it comes to type 1. 

Per the celiac disease foundation:

“The link between type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease was first established in the 1960s. The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 8%, and about 1% in the general population. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, and the significantly higher prevalence rate of celiac disease in diabetes patients, many doctors recommend getting screened for celiac disease after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as celiac patients getting screened for type 1 diabetes.

A recent study in 2013, contributed to by Dr. Peter Green, a member of Celiac Disease Foundation’s Medical Advisory Board found that there were no standard uniform practices for screening type 1 diabetes patients for celiac disease. Of the facilities in the study that did screen for celiac disease, 60% of them only did so if there were symptoms present. The authors of the study suggested that a uniform protocol for screening should be in place, as well as a need for further education on the gluten-free diet in patients with type 1 diabetes for dietitians.”(1)

The unfortunate part of this is that once you are diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes, you become prone to developing others.  As for the signs, symptoms and treatment options, lets take a look.

Symptoms Of Celiac Disease:

Celiac disease symptoms typically involve the intestines and digestive system. They can also affect other parts of the body and children as well as adults tend to have a different set of symptoms.  Those symptoms are as follows:

Celiac Disease Symptoms in Children:

Children with celiac disease can feel tired and irritable. They may also be smaller than normal and have delayed puberty. Other common symptoms include:

      • weight loss
      • vomiting
      • abdominal bloating
      • abdominal pain
      • persistent diarrhea or constipation
      • pale, fatty, foul-smelling stools

How To Diagnose Celiac Disease In Adults

Adults with celiac disease may experience digestive symptoms. In most cases, however, symptoms also affect other areas of the body. These symptoms may include:

      • iron-deficiency anemia
      • joint pain and stiffness
      • weak, brittle bones
      • fatigue
      • seizures
      • skin disorders
      • numbness and tingling in the hands and feet
      • tooth discoloration or loss of enamel
      • pale sores inside the mouth
      • irregular menstrual periods
      • infertility and miscarriage

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Jan

1

Health Benefits Of Cayenne Pepper (Capsicum)

Health Benefits Of Cayenne Pepper (Capsicum)I must admit, I’m not a huge fan of “hot/spicy foods”, but I love cayenne pepper, well, in the right quantity, LOL!  Cayenne pepper (aka capsicum) is used in a variety of ways for both cooking and medicinal purposes. There are a number of ways you can incorporate cayenne pepper and cayenne pepper capsules into your daily diet.

Your metabolism can be boosted in a number of different ways through the consumption of spicy foods, but the key is eating the right spices, in the right quantities, and through the right foods, so lets take a closer look! 

Cayenne Pepper And Hypertension:

Cayenne pepper helps to make blood pressure levels normal. It regulates the flow of blood from the head to the foot and equalizes blood pressure. It also equalizes blood pressure in the arteries and veins instantly. It removes blockages present in the arteries and thus, improves the flow of blood. Since cayenne pepper reduces the risk of atherosclerosis, it simultaneously lowers the risk of hypertension.

Cayenne Pepper Weight Loss:

The main active ingredient in cayenne pepper is capsaicin. It is said to be a “thermogenic chemical” which will help speed your metabolism and decrease your appetite. It’s actually a wonderful herb. It not only can promote weight loss, but it does many other wonderful things such as: increase blood flow, maintains healthy blood pressure, increase your sex drive, may help reduce ulcers and promotes a healthy digestive system.

Cayenne Pepper And Pain Relief:

Per the University Of Maryland medical center, capsaicin has very powerful pain-relieving properties when applied to the skin. It reduces the amount of substance P, a chemical that carries pain messages to the brain, in your body. When there is less substance P, the pain messages no longer reach the brain, and you feel relief. Capsaicin is often recommended for the following conditions:

  • Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as joint or muscle pain from fibromyalgia or other causes
  • Nerve pain from shingles and other painful skin conditions (postherpetic neuralgia) that happens even after the skin blisters have gone away. Research is mixed, and it may be that it works for some people and not others. Check with your doctor to see if trying capsaicin ointment is right for you.
  • Pain after surgery, such as a mastectomy or an amputation
  • Has shown to assist in pain from nerve damage in the feet or legs from diabetes, called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, check out the study here.
  • Low back pain. Several studies suggest capsaicin cream can reduce lower back pain.

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Mar

18

Interesting Facts About Bananas

Interesting Facts About BananasHands down one of my favorite snacks healthy and tasty often do not go together, and it’s not surprising that a majority of people, especially children, choose bananas as a healthy snack choice.  Are they good for you though? Lets take a closer look!

Switching to a healthier diet without compromising on taste may be easier than you think.  Incorporating bananas is the perfect example.  Counted among the most popular fruits in the world, bananas can cater to your taste buds while offering many health benefits.

Bananas Improve Digestion:

The contents of dietary fiber and carbohydrates present in bananas help to regulate bowel movements which then result in healthy digestive system.  It is ideal for getting rid of chronic constipation due to the pectin contents present in it.  It helps reduce stomach ulcers and also diminishes the risk of developing gastric cancer.

Bananas And Your Bones:

Per the University Of Maryland and University of Kansas Medical Center, bananas benefit the kidneys and the bones due to their high potassium content.  A normal intake of potassium suppresses calcium excretion in the urine and minimizes the risk of kidney stones.  Also, for the same reason (suppressing of calcium excretion), it minimizes the loss of calcium from the body and thereby reduces the risk of osteoporosis!
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Mar

10

What Is Carrageenan? Is It Safe For Diabetics?

What Is Carrageenan? Is It Safe For Diabetics?Ok, so over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been receive a ton of questions relating to a little known product called carrageenan. Several of you have been wondering if its really safe for you as it seems to be getting a bad wrap out there especially that it is used in healthy/certified USDA products.  I mean, anything with the USDA symbol is suppose to be the best and healthiest, right?  Well, lets take a closer look!

 

What Is Carrageenan?

Ah and here we are,  so what exactly is this stuff?  Well, simply put carrageenan is a seaweed-derived ingredient, manufacturers use this additive to thicken and emulsify everything from cottage cheese to juice.  Since seaweed is a low-allergy, non-animal derived source, natural and organic companies tend to favor it. Perhaps the most notorious source of this thickener is non-dairy milks, everything from hazelnut milk to oat milk.  But it also commonly appears in everything from cottage cheese to frozen pizzas, coconut milk and ice cream.
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