Tag: cooking

Feb

8

Health Benefits Of Tempeh!

Health Benefits Of TempehThe other day, someone on my Facebook page posed a question to me about tempeh (pronounced “temp-a”).  Honestly I didn’t know much about the product, but always heard the health benefits of tempeh are plentiful.  As opposed to many other soy foods tempeh is made from whole soybeans, and possesses all the health benefits of soybeans.  Also the tempeh fermentation changes the properties of the soybeans.  So lets take a closer look at this nutritional powerhouse! 

 

Tempeh And Protein:

Looking to add protein to your diet, then tempeh could be the perfect choice!  Each 1-cup serving of tempeh contains 31 grams of protein, which is 55 percent of the recommended daily intake for men and 67 percent for women, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Tempeh contains high-quality complete protein and provides all the amino acids you must obtain from your diet.  Its protein content helps you maintain muscle tissue, and also make enzymes your cells need to function.  Tempeh is also easily absorbed and utilized as protein from animal sources, such as eggs or meat, so it makes a particularly welcome addition to vegetarian and vegan diets.

Tempeh & Blood Sugars:

The protein source is excellent for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, who tend to have problems with animal sources of protein.  Like the majority of protein sources, the protein and fiber content in tempeh can also help in regards to ones blood sugar by keeping levels under control by preventing rapid spikes in one’s glucose.  Why is this? Simply stated, the 31 whopping grams of protein in just one cup!  

Just make sure your looking at the fermented tempeh vs non-fermented as fermented soy stops the effect of phytic acid and increases the availability of isoflavones. The fermentation also creates the probiotics, the “good” bacteria the body is absolutely dependent on, such as lactobacilli that increase the quantity, availability, digestibility and assimilation of nutrients in the body.

Many studies have shown traditionally fermented soy, which is the form that is very popular in many Asian cultures-aids in preventing and reducing a variety of diseases including certain forms of heart disease.

I will definitely be checking this out on my next trip to the supermarket!

Tempeh And Probiotics:

Tempeh is full of healthy probiotics or “good bacteria” which you would typically associate with yogurt because it’s fermented.  The enzymes produced by tempeh’s fermentation process helps your body fight bad bacteria, better absorb important nutrients like iron, and aid in the digestive process.  Not only does tempeh’s fermentation process produce natural antibiotic agents, but it leaves desirable soy isoflavones intact.  Soy isoflavones have many health benefits such as strengthening bones, easing menopausal symptoms, and reducing risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers.
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Feb

1

Lauric Acid And Coconut Oil:

Lauric Acid And Coconut OilOne of major components that we’ve switched out in our household is what we cook with – After researching several alternatives there was one that kept popping up, coconut and coconut oil and here’s why.

Lauric acid is representative of a class of biological molecules called fatty acids.  It is a white or colorless organic solid with needle-like crystals.  Coconut and palm kernel are the major sources of lauric acid.  It exhibits strong antimicrobial activity and thus is used by pharmaceutical companies that prepare antimicrobial drugs.  Lauric acid tends to irritate the mucous membrane of the gastrointestinal tract.  Consult your physician to determine if lauric acid-based medications are safe for you.

Lauric Acid And Cooking:

Both palm oils and coconut oil, excellent sources of lauric acid, are acceptable for use in cooking.  The first type is widely used in commercial food production, because it is relatively inexpensive.  The second is prized for its sweet flavor and is often preferred for making particular types of seafood.  The use of these options varies by region.  In the United States and much of North America, for example, people rely more on vegetable oil, but many tropical countries still predominantly use coconut and palm versions.
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