Tag: children

Jan

18

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes, Is There A Connection?

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes, Is There A Connection?So the other day I fielded a question about celiac disease and if there is a direct correlation between having celiac and type 1 diabetes.  A great question as more type 1 diabetics seem to be diagnosed with celiac disease after their type 1 diagnosis.  So what’s the deal with celiac disease?  What is it exactly and what can be done to help alleviate the symptoms?  Lets take a closer look!

 

What Is Celiac Disease:

Celiac disease is a digestive illness that occurs due to the ingestion of gluten. If you have celiac disease, your intestines cannot tolerate the presence of gliadin, which is a component of gluten. Gluten is present in wheat, barley, and rye. When a person with celiac disease eats foods with gluten, such as bread or cereal, their immune system inappropriately reacts to the ingested gluten and causes inflammation and injury to the small intestine. This results in symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, and weight loss, as well as an inability to absorb important food nutrients.

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes:

So what’s the deal when it comes to type 1 diabetes and a celiac disease diagnosis?  While there doesn’t appear to be a direct link between type 2 diabetes and celiac that’s not necessarily the case when it comes to type 1. 

Per the celiac disease foundation:

“The link between type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease was first established in the 1960s. The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 8%, and about 1% in the general population. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, and the significantly higher prevalence rate of celiac disease in diabetes patients, many doctors recommend getting screened for celiac disease after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as celiac patients getting screened for type 1 diabetes.

A recent study in 2013, contributed to by Dr. Peter Green, a member of Celiac Disease Foundation’s Medical Advisory Board found that there were no standard uniform practices for screening type 1 diabetes patients for celiac disease. Of the facilities in the study that did screen for celiac disease, 60% of them only did so if there were symptoms present. The authors of the study suggested that a uniform protocol for screening should be in place, as well as a need for further education on the gluten-free diet in patients with type 1 diabetes for dietitians.”(1)

The unfortunate part of this is that once you are diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes, you become prone to developing others.  As for the signs, symptoms and treatment options, lets take a look.

Symptoms Of Celiac Disease:

Celiac disease symptoms typically involve the intestines and digestive system. They can also affect other parts of the body and children as well as adults tend to have a different set of symptoms.  Those symptoms are as follows:

Celiac Disease Symptoms in Children:

Children with celiac disease can feel tired and irritable. They may also be smaller than normal and have delayed puberty. Other common symptoms include:

      • weight loss
      • vomiting
      • abdominal bloating
      • abdominal pain
      • persistent diarrhea or constipation
      • pale, fatty, foul-smelling stools

How To Diagnose Celiac Disease In Adults

Adults with celiac disease may experience digestive symptoms. In most cases, however, symptoms also affect other areas of the body. These symptoms may include:

      • iron-deficiency anemia
      • joint pain and stiffness
      • weak, brittle bones
      • fatigue
      • seizures
      • skin disorders
      • numbness and tingling in the hands and feet
      • tooth discoloration or loss of enamel
      • pale sores inside the mouth
      • irregular menstrual periods
      • infertility and miscarriage

Continue Reading

Dec

19

The Dangers Yellow 5 Dye!

The Dangers Of Yellow 5 Dye!Last Friday I we discussed red dye in one of my blog posts.  Well, this week I would like to expand on that with yellow 5 dye.  As mentioned last week,  artificial dyes can be found in more than just food products that you might expect.  It is easy to see brightly colored candies and drinks and know instantly that they contain artificial dyes.  You need to be extremely careful and read the ingredient labels which reveals artificial dyes in many potentially surprising products including Personal Care Products & Skin Care.

As mentioned last week, the three most widely used culprits—Yellow 5, Yellow 6 and Red 40—contain compounds, including benzidine and 4-aminobiphenyl, that research shows has linked with cancer!  Why is this though?  Lets take a closer look at yellow 5 dye!

What Is Yellow 5 Dye:

Yellow 5 dye is also known as tartrazine or E102.  Yellow 5 is widely used in the making of potato chips, jams, candy, drinks and even pet food.  It is also added to shampoo and other cosmetic products, as well as vitamins and certain medications.  Yellow 5 is banned in Austria and Norway, and other European countries have issued warnings about their possible side effects, however it is still freely and extensively used within the United Sates. Why does yellow 5 get a bad wrap in other countries but not the United States, well, check this out.

  • When you use products with yellow 5 dye, you lose zinc through your urine and saliva.  If you have ADHD, you lose it even faster than someone without ADHD.  Zinc, an essential trace mineral, is required by hundreds of your body’s enzymes involved with the metabolism of protein, carbohydrate, fat and alcohol.  Zinc is also critical for wound healing, sense of taste and smell, immune system function, bone strength, thyroid function, blood clotting, cognitive functions, prenatal development, and sperm production.  Even a mild deficiency can produce a wide range of physical and mental problems.
  • All the synthetic dyes are allowed to contain harmful contaminants like lead, mercury, arsenic, and benzidine (a carcinogen).  Lead usually targets the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells first, eventually attacking your nervous system. The primary effects of mercury on infants and children is to damage neurological development.  Arsenic can cause several kinds of cancer, as well as headaches and confusion.  While it is true that coloring don’t have large amounts of any of these contaminants, there is no good reason to consume them.
  • As long ago as 1985, Pediatrics – the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics – described the following side effects of Yellow 5: allergies, thyroid tumors, lymphomas (cancer), chromosomal damage, asthma, and urticaria (hives).  Even earlier, Cesarani (1978) described the broncho-constriction of Yellow 5 as similar to aspirin in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics.  The connection between this dye and asthma was the reason the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first required it to be listed by name on ingredient labels.

Continue Reading

%d bloggers like this: