Nov

30

Can Diabetics Eat Apples?

diabetesApples are undeniably good for you, especially if you have diabetes.  Apples are high in the soluble fiber pectin, making them good at controlling blood sugar by releasing it a little more slowly into the bloodstream (no this does NOT replace insulin) nor do I recommend you stop taking your insulin, so lets just clear that up right now. In addition to helping to regulate blood sugar and bowel function, soluble fiber is thought to have an anti-inflammatory affect that may help diabetics recover faster from infections.

Apple Vitamin C Benefits:

Apples benefit your health by boosting your intake of vitamin C, or ascorbic acid. Vitamin C helps you make collagen, a protein found abundantly in your skin. Collagen is a crucial structural component of skin and helps maintain your skin’s waterproof barrier. Low collagen production caused by vitamin C deficiency affects your skin, leading to a re-opening of old wounds and skin tearing. A large apple contains 10.3 milligrams of vitamin C, 14 percent of the daily vitamin C requirements for women, according to the Linus Pauling Institute, or 11 percent for men.

Apple and Cancer:

Lab studies have shown that several compounds in this juicy fruit curb the growth of cancer cells — but apples are most potent when eaten whole (minus the stem and seeds, of course). People who munch more than one a day lower their risk for several cancers (oral, esophageal, colon, breast, ovarian, prostate, and others) by 9 to 42 percent, Italian researchers found.

What Are Phenols?

Apples contains phenols, which have a double effect on cholesterol. It reduces bad cholesterol and increases good cholesterol. They prevent LDL cholesterol from turning into oxidized LDL, a very dangerous form of bad cholesterol which can be deadly.

Glycemic Index Classification:diabetes12

Since one apple contains a moderate amount of carbohydrates, diabetics must count the fruit as part of their healthy eating plan and its generally a good idea to bolus for them (depending on your current blood sugar levels). The average apple contains approximately 20 g of carbohydrates, most of which come from the fruit’s natural sugars. The American Diabetes Association recommends that “fruit can be eaten in exchange for other carbohydrates in your meal plan such as starches, grains or dairy.”

Apples are also great to help cleanse your body of toxins both inside and out. They’re known to clear out heavy metals, such as lead and mercury. Staying hydrated is important, and the one thing they are great at is  quenching your thirst and increasing body fluids. They also neutralize free radicals.

If this article on apples was helpful, please leave a comment right below my bio or hit the share button to share with your friends 😀

Thanks for Reading!

Chris

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Category: Diabetes Info, Health

About the Author ()

As a type 1 diabetic, I made the switch to an organic lifestyle several years ago after being diagnosed with Diabetes in 2006. Living with diabetes is hard enough, why make it more difficult by consuming products with chemicals, toxins and other harmful, unhealthy ingredients. To me, the choice was easy and just made sense. We hope you enjoy our blog! Feel free to look around and check out all of our products by clicking through the tabs above! Thanks for stopping by and also please be sure to check us out on Facebook and Twitter by liking our pages below! You never know what freebies we will be giving away!! Don't forget to check out the website as well at www.theorganicdiabetic.org

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